Italian Oil Poached Tuna

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NorthSIKer
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Italian Oil Poached Tuna

#1 Post by NorthSIKer » Mon Aug 27, 2018 8:38 pm

Italian Oil Poached Tuna

I don’t normally post recipes but an enquiry came up when I was describing what I was planning to do with a couple of mac tuna I caught.

The resulting tuna is much like canned tuna, but much, much tastier. I have tried it with both longtail tuna and mac tuna and both come up brilliant. I suspect any tuna would be pretty good. I like to use the longtails primarily for sashimi and poke and use mac tunas for the poached tuna.

It is simple to make. Only ingredients are the tuna, salt, sugar, water, rosemary, garlic and extra virgin olive oil.

1. Take the loins off the tuna. If you haven’t done this before, it is well worth googling some instructions and videos, as dressing down a tuna is a bit different to filleting other fish. I certainly stuffed up my first tuna pretty bad.
2. Deep skin the tuna (there is a lot of the white stringy connective tissue near the skin) and cut the loins into pieces roughly a fist in size (depending on the size of the fish these will be from a baby’s fist to a man’s fist).
3. Make a brine by dissolving 35 grams of salt and 35 grams of sugar per litre of water.
4. Place the tuna chunks in a pot and cover with the brine. Place in the fridge for about 12 hours.
5. Drain the chunks of tuna.
6. Crush up the garlic and strip the leaves off the rosemary. Spread a bit of each in the bottom of the pot and drizzle with olive oil. (Note a slow cooker, which can be purchased for about $20 from Kmart, Big W or a bunch of other places is by far the best for cooking this. Otherwise, you can do it in a pot on the stove but it is more work).
7. Add a layer of drained tuna chunks, packing them tightly (so you don’t need too much oil). Sprinkle with more garlic and rosemary leaves and another drizzle of oil (to stop the chunks sticking).
8. Keep layering the tuna, garlic, rosemary and oil until all the tuna is in the pot. Add more olive oil until the fish is just covered (alright if a couple of corners stick out).
9. Cook on low heat in the slow cooker until cooked through (about 2 hrs or so). Turn the fish over about half way through. If cooking on a stove, cook on lowest heat and take off the heat whenever it gets a bit hot. You only want the oil to be 80-90 degrees Celsius at most.
10. Once cooked let the tuna cool in the oil in the pot to room temperature.
11. Pack the tuna into containers or bowls and cover with oil from the cooking. Place in the fridge.

The tuna is ok as soon as it is cooked but is better after a day or more in the fridge. Reheat slightly (microwave is fine) and serve on crackers. Or use in anything you would use canned tuna for.

If you are really good you can bottle the tuna and store it. I’ve never tried and it keeps well for at least a week in the fridge.

There are plenty of other variations that can be found on the internet but I am happy with the above as simple (like me ) but giving great results.

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