Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from it!

Discussion of safety equipment and use.

Re: Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from i

Postby arpie » Wed Dec 12, 2012 7:12 am

Yep, we've covered the surf entry & exit in the thread previously & agreed that it is silly to be tethered at that stage of your outing.

HOWEVER ...... it is when you are out on the briny & get knocked off, fall off, whatever, UNEXPECTEDLY that you CANNOT expect to hold onto your paddle as a safety aid. IF you can still hang on to your kayak (assuming you haven't been swept/blown away from it) you have a far better chance of getting back to shore & let's face it - more chance of survival than if you aren't able to hold onto it. If you are far enough out, you could succumb to exhaustion, trying to swim back to shore - with an inflated life vest on (or any life vest) it will not be as easy as 'normal' swimming ...... and if the water is cold as well .....

Also, if you ARE able to activate a Mayday - you will be easier to be found if still holding your yak, than just bobbing round in the ocean, even if you aren't physically capable of getting back onto it due to exhaustion, cold, whatever.

Rather than a self inflating life jacket, (which could self inflate if a big wave gets you) I just blow mine up manually to give me enough buoyancy, so that should I tip ....... or get into a scary situation ....... I can then deploy the gas cannister if required, yet still be reasonably buoyant.

cheers

Roberta
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Re: Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from i

Postby Jamie D » Wed Dec 12, 2012 1:46 pm

Agree with everything you said Roberta. Did you see what I did there I set it up with my post so you could nail that point home. That's why they pay me the big dollars aye :lol:

Bit of Xmas humour there. Love this forum .

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Re: Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from i

Postby nqkayaktours » Thu Dec 13, 2012 7:29 pm

BATMAN wrote:Especially if you were in a situation where you were in a fast moving river situation.


:gu: :gu: NEVER tether yourself to the yak in a fast moving river system at all. Or any moving water river system for that matter. Thats just asking for trouble. And BIG trouble at that.

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Re: Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from i

Postby Dodge » Fri Dec 14, 2012 9:34 am

arpie wrote:
Rather than a self inflating life jacket, (which could self inflate if a big wave gets you) I just blow mine up manually to give me enough buoyancy, so that should I tip ....... or get into a scary situation ....... I can then deploy the gas cannister if required, yet still be reasonably buoyant.

Roberta was very interested in your partial blow up comment.

After each outing are you deflating the PFD, or just leaving that touch of air inside all the time?.

I always wear a manual inflatable when fishing alone and can see the benefit in your idea, and to this point had only thought of a manual inflation once in the water, before activating the compressed air.
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Re: Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from i

Postby arpie » Fri Dec 14, 2012 9:42 am

Hi Dodge

I only partially blow it up if I feel I am in a bad situation & can't get out of it quickly, purely as a safety precaution - normally I would head back in asap!! :wink: I've only done it a few times in my thousands of outings. I did it in NZ just recently, when fishing offshore in ferocious winds & rain.

I deflate it again when I feel safe enough. With manually inflated vests (gas powered or by mouth) the one thing that COULD happen is that you get knocked out/unconscious & are unable to activate the inflation mechanism once you are in the water ........ so the partially inflated vest should still keep you afloat, face up & safe til you can inflate it further.

cheers

Roberta
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Re: Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from i

Postby cruiser » Fri Dec 14, 2012 7:42 pm

arpie wrote:Hi Dodge

I only partially blow it up if I feel I am in a bad situation & can't get out of it quickly, purely as a safety precaution - normally I would head back in asap!! :wink: I've only done it a few times in my thousands of outings. I did it in NZ just recently, when fishing offshore in ferocious winds & rain.

I deflate it again when I feel safe enough. With manually inflated vests (gas powered or by mouth) the one thing that COULD happen is that you get knocked out/unconscious & are unable to activate the inflation mechanism once you are in the water ........ so the partially inflated vest should still keep you afloat, face up & safe til you can inflate it further.

cheers

Roberta
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Re: Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from i

Postby arpie » Fri Dec 14, 2012 9:36 pm

:lol: :lol: No worries, Cruiser!! Glad to be able to help out!!

There is no reason why you can't fully inflate manually it if you feel the need requires it (so long as you have time & are able to do so) - it also saves the lifejacket's 'bulb' for a more serious, impromptu situation (and saves you a few $$ as well! :gu: )

cheers

Roberta

An unbiased Pros & Cons for being leashed to your yak (for the whole article) Just insert 'kayak' where 'ski' is mentioned!
http://www.surfski.info/getting-started ... --why.html

The Summary

Your ski is much, much more visible in the water than you are; if you end up in the water without your ski, your chances of being rescued plummet. And this is especially important if you're in the open ocean. You do NOT want to lose your ski.

The primary reason then for using a leash is to prevent the ski from being blown away from you, should you fall off into the water.

Secondary reasons are:
To prevent the paddle from drifting away should you need both hands for some other task e.g. firing flares;
(In some circumstances) to prevent your losing the ski in the surf (but be aware that if you get into really big surf, your leash is either going to snap or do other damage like breaking your paddle.)
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Re: Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from i

Postby tonystott » Sat Dec 14, 2013 8:31 pm

Sorry to regurgitate an old thread, but I just (finally!) made a tether for me. This is way more important for a sailing kayak like a Hobie Island, as it is far more likely to drift out of reach of a swimmer due to its greater windage.

My set-up is not much different than the other ones shown here EXCEPT that all the ones I have seen appear to assume that the wearer has a strong attachment point. I was going to use the strap on my PFD, but it has a plastic buckle. So rather than wearing a full harness (as required for AYF offshore racing), I have added a loop in the rope about 70cms away from the end, so I can grab hold of the rope whether or not the PFD strap holds.

This is a simple and cost-free way to add to the functionality of your own safety tether...
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Re: Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from i

Postby Jamie D » Sat Dec 14, 2013 9:46 pm

I've sorted my way of feeling safe , I never let go of my tethered paddle unless I'm handling my rods . I've never gotten around to tethering my body to the yak , I liked the idea originally but as time has wore on I've never bothered and it hasn't worried me .
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Re: Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from i

Postby arpie » Thu Apr 20, 2017 9:13 pm

Reviving an old thread that is still extremely relevant to those fishing offshore in particular (but also applies to those in lakes & dams & estuaries ..... if the weather turns 'nasty' ...... (please note: those fishing faster flowing rivers - would NOT be recommended to be tied to their yaks.)

On a serious note. I went out from Beachlands yesterday. nice morning .Three very good snapper and a baby mako.
On pulling in my new anchor I managed to unleash my paddle. Had a good go at leaning over to retrieve it - Got hit by a wave and went in. stupid I know. By the time I'd recovered my wits the kayak was a good way off. Had a go for half hour chasing but was fruitless. 2.5 ks from shore. 20 knot moderate seas.
I'd always been confident I could swim back that distance but in those conditions my best effort was basically stopping me from being taken by the current.
Tried flagging down a few boats by waving the paddle but no luck.
7 hours later I was picked up by a great family out for a night sale with temp of 32 and numb fingers n toes. That was the scariest thing that's ever happened to me by a long shot.

So I learned that when you wear a life jacket that's a bit big but will do.it won't do. ? spent hours trying to pull it down.


If your on the water and you don't contribute to the coast Guard do it. Within 7 minutes of my wife calling them a chopper was in the sky and the boat was out searching. They were only a kilometer away when I was picked up.
Once they got me on board the help of the awesome family who picked me up they stopped my mild hyperthermia from developing.

Having flairs and the like on your boat is great but a whistle or something like on your jacket is also essential. Going out by yourself is fine . But if everyone else goes in there's a reason for it.

I'm sure you guys are far less retarded than me. But shit happens. The Sea is not your friend.

Thanks to my father in law .The family who pulled me out who's names I don't even know, the amazing coastguard and beechlands St Johns volunteers.


If you are on Facebook - check out all the replies to the post here - there are too many to post here:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/KayakFi ... 960166161/

HOWEVER, some recent relevant info from Rob Fort (who I quoted back on page 3):
Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 8.06.20 PM.png


Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 8.08.50 PM.png

And Rob DID mean to say 'rear/stern'

So ..... go thru ALL the pages here, read all the replies & see which ones you agree with ...... check out the different options that are available - I see that back in 2011, I didn't always wear a life jacket - please note, I wear one ALL THE TIME (and have done for some years now) on the off-chance that I may need to use it one day! :beye:

What do you reckon?? Is it a good idea to tether yourself to your yak in rough conditions (whether offshore or inshore?) Personally, I reckon it is a YES!

cheers

Roberta
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Re: Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from i

Postby laneends » Fri Apr 21, 2017 11:07 am

Biggest threat is anchoring strong tide. You go with tide, yak stays put and odds are you are not even holding the paddle which defeats the hanging onto a leashed paddle alternative. A leashed paddle with those snap lock connectors will disconnect if you go over in many instances anyway
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Re: Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from i

Postby NorthSIKer » Fri Apr 21, 2017 3:42 pm

arpie wrote:What do you reckon?? Is it a good idea to tether yourself to your yak in rough conditions (whether offshore or inshore?) Personally, I reckon it is a YES!


Something I am weighing up myself. Spot on that a big risk is if you come out, the yak drifts away faster than you can swim. A light kayak propelled by wind moves much faster than the water and it is hard to swim fast with a PFD on.

I reckon this scenario is probably the most likely mishap to happen kayaking on open waters.

I can understand why white water kayakers won't tether - they are in a dynamic environment where it is important to be able to swim out quickly plus they are never far from the bank. Surf ski paddlers where a leg rope as the very light surf ski gets blown away very quickly from the paddler. There have been a number in incidents of this I have read about including at least one death (probably more).

Sea kayakers still debate this - the main consideration is the possibility of entanglement in the rope when you go over. Sea kayakers that can roll rely on that but even the best can sometimes get separated from their boats or have the roll fail.

I recently added a tether on the back deck which is very quick to clip on the tow point on my vest whilst on the water. Idea is if conditions get hairy I clip in to be safe. The same line is also set up to work as a tow line for another kayak if needed. I still need to practice using it by exiting the boat in rough conditions.

As to tethers, it is important to:

a) use a relatively thick line (e.g. waterski line) even though thinner line is plenty strong. If you get wrapped up a thicker line is much easier to untangle / unwrap and also won't cut into you like a thin one under pressure.
b) have a quick release mechanism where the line attaches to your pfd so that you can detach quickly if required (e.g boat is getting sucked into a rocky surf zone).

I think most fishing kayakers with their sit on tops should seriously consider a leg rope.
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Re: Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from i

Postby Whisky » Fri Apr 21, 2017 9:04 pm

I never use the paddle keepers on the Stealth or Dorado as I don't like the idea of not able to brace within 0.5 seconds. I have done a sea kayaking course as a teenager and I was told the paddle is equivalent to your life at sea. I always have my paddle in a ready to brace position when fishing. With my paddle tethered to the yak. It is next to impossible to lose the yak. Having heard the above discussion, I am now considering tether my PFD to the paddle which is connected to the yak during rough condition.
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Re: Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from i

Postby Snow » Fri Apr 21, 2017 9:22 pm

If blokes in stinkboats have to attach one of these to themselves to stop their boat buggering off on them
download (3).jpg

Why shouldn't anyone in a craft that can be taken away from them by wind not wear a tether??
I have been at the local marina with a man who was waiting for the police rescue boat to come in with the survivor of a boating mishap.
Sadly it was his dad's best mate and not his dad, whose body was never found.
There are no valid excuses what so ever to not ensure you return alive from a day of fishing
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Re: Tie yourself to your yak so you are not separated from i

Postby coattail rider » Mon May 15, 2017 12:54 pm

Snow wrote:There are no valid excuses what so ever to not ensure you return alive from a day of fishing


i can think of a few....like when your mate catches the better cod!!!!
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